Early Learning Program

 

The Problem

Teen moms striving to break the cycle of poverty usually have a limited vocabulary and lack the ability to communicate with standard word choice. These deficiencies are passed on to their children -- which means both generations lack the language abilities necessary to succeed in school.

In fact, children of teen parents are 50% more likely to repeat a grade and are less likely to graduate from high school. This is a significant problem because education is key in breaking out of poverty.

 

The Solution

The good news is that children who attend a high quality Early Childhood program are:

• less likely to repeat a grade in school
• less likely to drop out of high school
• more likely to attend and graduate from college
• more likely to be employed as an adult
• less likely to receive public assistance as an adult

Hope House has its very own in-house Early Learning Program, designed to enhance language acquisition skills in the children of our teen moms, better positioning them to break the cycle of poverty. This program provides age-appropriate language development lessons and preschool activities based on the nationally recognized Creative Curriculum from Teaching Strategies for Infants Toddlers and Twos.

Under the supervision of our Early Learning Program Coordinator, trained volunteers provide Early Learning lessons to the children of our teen moms while they are busy working in our GED or College & Career Support Lab or taking other classes at Hope House. The goal is to help the children of our teen moms develop the skills they need to succeed in school.

 

The National Center for Infants, Toddlers and Families identifies 7 social-emotional characteristics that are essential for school readiness:

  • Confidence
  • Curiosity
  • Determination
  • Self-control
  • Relatedness
  • Ability to communicate
  • Cooperation

All of these happen when children attend the Early Learning Program at Hope House.